How ABA Model Rule 1.4 on Communication Impacts How Lawyers Can Bill For Their Fees and Costs

[Editor’s note: this is another in a series of blog posts discussing how specific ABA Model Rules of Prof. Conduct that all lawyers must follow impacts how lawyers can and cannot bill clients.]

Rule 1.4(b) Communication provides that “[a] lawyer shall explain a matter to the extent reasonably necessary to permit the client to make informed decisions regarding the representation.”

In interpreting an attorney’s duty of “communication” pursuant to RPC 1.4, courts have held that an attorney has a mandatory ethical duty to “clearly explain” fees and costs to clients. See, e.g., Board of Prof. Resp., Wyoming State Bar v. Bruce S. Asay, WSB #5-1739, 2016 WY 47 (WY 2016)(court found that attorney violated rule 1.4 by failing to “clearly explain” to client the charges).

Providing a “clear explanation” has been interpreted to mean that each billing entry in a fee bill must be sufficiently explained. See ABA Formal Op. 93-370 at p. 3 (attorney must provide a “sufficient explanation in the statement so that the client may reasonably be expected to understand what fees and other charges the client is actually being billed”). Courts deny compensation for billing entries that are not sufficiently explained as they do not provide a basis for determining the reasonableness of the billed for fee or cost. See, e.g., Grievson v. Rochester Psychiatric Center, 2010 WL 3894983 at *8 (W.D.N.Y. 2010)(“Individual entries that include only vague and generic descriptions of the work performed do not provide an adequate basis upon which to evaluate the reasonableness of the time spent.”). Continue reading