Lawyer Who Prepared Legal Bills With Fake Hours Loses Job & Is Suspended From Practice of Law

[Editor’s note: this is another in a series of blog posts addressing specific ABA Model Rules of Prof. Conduct (RPC) that impact how lawyers can and cannot bill clients.]

In my previous blog post, I covered RPC 1.4 Communications. This is the RPC governing how lawyers communicate their fees and costs through their billing statements to clients.

Normally lawyers run afoul of RPC 1.4 (and other RPCs) by sending out legal bills with false billing entries. But as is illustrated in the case of People v. Mary Jaclyn Cook, 17 PDJ 051(Colo. August 10, 2017), lawyers also can get into trouble for just preparing to send out legal bills with false billing entries.

The facts as reported in the Cook case are that attorney Cook returned from a two-week honeymoon in late 2016 and discovered that she would be unable to meet her firm’s minimum hourly billing “expectation” for the year. Thereupon Cook decided the way to meet her firm’s annual billing expectation was to pad her year end bills with fake time which totaled almost $40,000 in time that she did not work.

When confronted by her supervising partners, attorney Cook initially maintained that the billing entries were legitimate. Later that same day she confessed that she had fabricated and inflated time entries.

Unfortunately for attorney Cook, her decision wound up not only costing her a job, but also a nine month suspension from the practice of law for violating the RPC. Continue reading