It’s Deja Vu All Over Again As COVID-19 Presents Law Firms With Same Financial Issues Faced During The Great Recession

With almost daily report of law firm layoffs and/or reductions in compensation, it looks like the COVIS-19 pandemic is going to have the same effect on the financial health of the legal industry as did the Great Recession in 2007-2009.  And if what happened in the Great Recession is any indicator, law firm clients will need to scrutinize more closely their legal bills.

One reason for closer scrutiny is because of what happened in the Great Recession with regards to staffing cuts. In the Great Recession, the support staff rather than attorneys bore the brunt of law firm cutbacks. This was because law firms were reluctant to let go of the attorney talent they worked so hard to attract and invested so much to develop. So the only other place to turn for savings in a labor intensive business is to support staff.

As I have blogged about before, cutting back support staff and increasing the ratio of attorneys to support staff will save law firms money. But, it also almost invariably means increased costs for law firm clients. Continue reading

How To Discuss Fee Bill Issues With Your Lawyer – Part IV: The Nuclear Option

[This is the fourth and final post in a series of posts on how to discuss and resolve fee bill disputes with your lawyer. If you have not done so already, it is a good idea to read the first three posts in this series.]

Invariably, whenever I write a post about a lawyer getting disciplined for an ethics violation involving fee billing, I will get emails. Mostly from individuals with comments or questions about lawyer discipline. And so it was that after my post about an lawyer who got a six month suspension for overbilling, I received emails from individuals with questions on the disciplinary process for lawyers.

Some of the most frequent questions I am asked are how to go about filing a complaint (and if a lawyer is needed to file the complaint), will the disciplinary agency get my money back or get my lawyer to answer my questions (or do whatever it is they want the lawyer to do), and can my lawyer retaliate against me (or file a suit against me for slander) if my complaint is dismissed? So with this the fourth and final post in this series, I would like to answer these questions and share the basics of filing a disciplinary complaint against a lawyer. Continue reading

How To Discuss Fee Bill Issues With Your Lawyer – Part III

[This is the third post in a series on how to discuss fee bill disputes with your lawyer. If you have not done so already, it is a good idea to read the first two posts in this series as they detail steps that should be taken before getting to the point where the additional steps outlined in the post should be considered.]

In my last post in this series, I ended with the assumption that communications with your lawyer and/or the firm’s managing partner or other partners in the firm failed to resolve the billing issues.  In this post I will discuss what additional steps may be taken to resolve the billing issues once direct communication has not worked or has broken down. Continue reading

Overbilling Lawyer Gets Support From Her Overbilled Clients

Making the rounds of legal publications last month was a story about an attorney in MA who was suspended for 6 months for overbilling her clients by 450 hours. According to the facts set out in IN RE: DOREEN ZANKOWSKI , the attorney claimed to have worked an incredible 3,893 hours in one year. This included 3,173 billable and 720 non-billable hours.

And according the Opinion, in addition to inflating her own hours, the time billed to clients by associates who worked under her was also inflated. However, there was no word in the Opinion as to what was done with the associates who were aware that their time was being inflated.

In reading the unusually long 42 page Opinion, something strange caught my eye.

[A full copy of this post is available to clients of legalbillaudit.com. To obtain a copy, please contact clientservices@legalbillaudit.com.]

Googling To Find Out If Your Attorney Uses Form Documents

In a prior blog post entitled “The ‘Does Anyone Have A Form That I Could Use’ Practice Section,” I poked gentle fun at a state bar practice section I belong to because most of the posts on the section listserve were from attorneys asking other attorneys if anyone had a particular form document that the inquiring attorney could use. Due to the volume of such requests, I had found it both amusing as well as telling that an awful lot of what attorneys do in most any practice area has to do with using forms.

And it seems that you no longer have to ask a fellow attorney for a form. You can just Google the name of a Motion or other type of legal document and you often will find a form. I have done this countless number times when reviewing legal bills from attorneys throughout the U.S.

Recently I had occasion to look up a Notice of Motion and Motion to Compel Testimony and Production of Documents in California. I suspected that the document the attorney billed 2 hours to prepare was a form document. So I Googled it, and sure enough I was taken to a form document. This form document not only had the basic form Notice and Motion, but it also had the argument for the attorney to use in support of the Motion including the supporting case authority. Comparing the attorney’s Motion with the form Motion, I could see that 90% of what was in the attorney’s Motion was in the form Motion. And the 10% the attorney had added did not take 2 hours. Continue reading

E-billing “Rules Engines:” They Work All of the Time Some of the Time

I’m going to write about something that many attorneys whose clients require them to submit their legal bills through e-billing programs already know. E-billing rules engines supposedly programmed to automatically spot and take deductions in legal invoices for violations of a company’s billing guidelines often do not work as advertised.

And when I say e-billing rules engines do not often work “as advertised,” I am talking about how e-billing companies promote the use of their rules engines.  As one e-billing company puts it on their website, “[Name of rules engine] automatically reviews, validates, flags, and adjusts line-item invoice charges to comply with billing guidelines.”

Wow! No human involvement needed. Just push a few buttons and sit back and reap the savings. Sounds incredible doesn’t it? Continue reading

The Lowdown on How To Discuss Fee Bill Issues With Your Lawyer

While most all of my blog posts have been directed to the corporate world and to lawyers, I thought it about time to write something for those individuals who have incurred large legal bills. For, in addition to doing fee bill reviews for corporations and governmental entities, I also do fee bill reviews for individuals.

Legal fees that individuals incur are usually much more modest than those incurred by large corporations. Nevertheless, I have reviewed legal bills for individuals who have incurred in excess of $1 Million in legal fees for probate and estate matters, real property disputes, business deals gone bad and yes, even for divorces. Continue reading

Sharing Comparative Data on Law Firm Compliance With Company Billing Guidelines

Once upon a time (or about 25 years ago), insurers began to use electronic bill review software to audit their attorneys’ compliance with their billing guidelines. In addition, many insurers established dedicated legal bill review units or used outside legal bill review vendors to audit legal bills.

As audited legal bills started coming back with deductions for numerous violation of insurer litigation and billing guidelines, a positive thing occurred. Attorneys actually began to read their clients’ billing guidelines. And what they found was numerous variations of essentially the same billing rules as well as many vaguely defined guidelines and rules. Continue reading

Lack of “Strategic Focus” A Top Concern in CLM Litigation Management Study

The CLM recently released its third in a series of litigation managements surveys the organization has done over the years. In the 2019 survey, some 80 litigation management executives were surveyed on a variety of litigation related topics. The comments to various questions in the survey revealed a number of interesting findings and concerns.

One of the top concerns expressed by survey participants was a “lack of strategic focus” on the part of outside counsel. Unfortunately, the CLM survey did not define what was meant by it use of the term “strategic focus.” To me, the term means simply an upfront focus on what needs to be done to achieve a favorable result sooner rather than later. Continue reading